Cambridge MP Julian Huppert’s Voting Record So Far


Thursday, September 9th, 2010. 7:01pm


Houses of Parliament, Claude MONET, c.1904

Image: Houses of Parliament, London, Monet c.1904

This week I have been looking at how Cambridge’s MP Julian Huppert has been voting since the city’s residents sent him to Parliament earlier this year.

Interesting Votes

I have written previously about the vote on the 8th of June 2010 where Julian Huppert abstained from voting on if the consideration of Trident and any potential replacement nuclear deterrent ought be included in the Strategic Defence and Security Review.

Another interesting vote was on the 14th of July 2010 when Julian Huppert voted not to keep the maximum period of detention of terrorist suspects at 28 days. Mr Huppert and those voting with him lost the vote, but had they won the maximum period for detention without trial of terrorist suspects would have reduced to 14 days. In this case Julian Huppert found himself voting against all but three of his Liberal Democrat party colleagues, so it is likely he rebelled against his party (and perhaps the Coalition Government’s) whip to make this principled stand. Mr Huppert is a member of the National Council of Human Rights organisation Liberty, who oppose detention without charge, so that may have influenced his decision. I think that Julian Huppert voted the right way on here; I think terrorist suspects should be dealt with in the same way as other suspected criminals and I am very concerned about the potential for abuse of so-called anti-terror legislation. I think Mr Huppert’s vote reflected the Liberal nature of the constituency he represents. I am astounded by the fact that the majority of Liberal Democrats, 44 of them, voted with the coalition government and against Mr Huppert. In this case Mr Huppert put his principles before his party and before propping up the coalition – something I would like to see him do more often – this was the only vote so far in which Mr Huppert appears to have rebelled. (Further details of the vote via PublicWhip)

Another vote which might surprise readers given the campaigning the Liberal Democrats were doing before the election, and their long-standing commitment to progressive taxation, came when on the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of an increase in Value Added Tax from 17.5% to 20% from the 4th of January 2011. (Further details via PublicWhip)

Julian Huppert’s Full Record To-Date

The below list is sorted by turnout (accounting for party abstentions), so if turning up to vote is an indication of how important a matter is seen to MPs it is in order of importance, with the most important first:

  • On the 28th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of changes to certain workplace pensions schemes intended to enable “auto-enrolment” and make them more tax efficient. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 28th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of raising VAT to 20% from the 4th of January 2011. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 7th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against an amendment criticising the Liberal – Conservative Coalition’s programme for government. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 6th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against rejecting a second reading of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill on the grounds it combines measures related to the proposal to introduce the Alternative Vote system with measures related to redrawing constituency boundaries. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 6th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted for the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill to be read a second time ie. for it to continue on its path towards becoming law. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 8th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert was absent when the majority of MPs voted against an amendment criticising the economic measures contained within the Liberal – Conservative Coalition’s programme for government. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 6th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of setting the following rules to govern the progress of the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill through the House of Commons: (Standing Order No. 83A(7)), (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 8th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert was absent when the majority of MPs agreed: “That an humble Address be presented to Her Majesty, as follows: (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 8th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert was absent when the majority of MPs voted against a motion asking the Government to consider the future of the UK’s nuclear deterrent as part of its Strategic Defence and Security Review. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 29th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to reject a motion on Local Government Finance which had been tabled by the acting leader of the opposition Harriet Harman. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 29th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to accept an amendment from the Prime Minister David Cameron which totally replaced a motion on Local Government Finance tabled by the acting leader of the opposition Harriet Harman. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 19th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted not to decline a second reading for Academies Bill ie. Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of the Academies Bill continuing on its path towards becoming law. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 7th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to reject a motion put forward by the Labour opposition stating: (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 19th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted for the Academies Bill to be read a second time ie. for it to continue on its path towards becoming law. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 7th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to cap civil service redundancy payments at a maximum of 12 months’ pay for compulsory redundancy and 15 months’ for voluntary exits. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert rejected a proposal to require an assessment of the impact on the proposed VAT increase on pensioners. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 7th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against rejecting a second reading of the Superannuation Bill on the grounds that it is unfair on certain classes of public sector workers and a lack of scrutiny and consultation during its development. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 19th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of setting the following rules to govern the way the Academies Bill was to progress through the House of Commons:Standing Order No. 83A(7)), (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 8th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to reject criticism of the government’s policy of cutting police numbers and establishing elected police chiefs. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of an increase in Value Added Tax from 17.5% to 20% from the 4th of January 2011. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 16th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert supported a motion stating: (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 16th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert rejected a motion put down by Labour MP Pat McFadden, preferring instead a version which had been amended by the Prime Minister. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against exempting charities’ charitable activities from the January 2011 increase in VAT from 17.5% to 20%. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against a provision requiring the production and publication of a report into the effect of a proposed VAT rise on mountain rescue services being included in the Finance Bill. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against removing the provision in the Finance Bill to increase Value Added Tax from 17.5% to 20%. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 14th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to approve the Police Grant Report (England and Wales) for 2010-11. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 20th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to approve the third reading of the Finance Bill ie. for it to be passed by the House of Commons. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 8th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to support the Government’s proposed policing reforms which include cutting police funding to help reduce the national deficit. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 13th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against delaying the increase in VAT from 17.5% to 20% by a year from 4 January 2011 to the 4 January 2012 if a report on the effects of the VAT rise had not been completed. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 7th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of setting rules to govern the progress of the Superannuation Bill through the House of Commons. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 6th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted for the Finance Bill to be read a second time ie. for it to continue on its path towards becoming law. The bill contained the changes to the tax system, as well as provisions relating to pensions and MPs expenses, which had been announced in the coalition’s emergency budget. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 14th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to support the establishment of a European Union External Action Service. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against removing the provision in the Academies Bill allowing special schools for children with special needs to become academies. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 26th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to approve the third reading of the Academies Bill ie. for it to be passed by the House of Commons. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 26th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to treat applications from schools seeking academy status received before the bill comes into force as if they were applications under the provisions of the bill. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert rejected a proposal to require Academy Schools to comply with legislation on pupil exclusions and behaviour partnerships which would otherwise not apply to them. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 26th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against the inclusion of a provision in the Academies Bill which would have required governing bodies of schools to run a consultation prior to making an application for academy status. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 12th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring the publication of an assessment of the impact on the banking sector of the change to the main rate of corporation tax for financial year 2011 proposed within the Finance Bill. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to allow selective schools which become academies an exemption from the general requirement for academy schools to provide education for pupils of different abilities. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 26th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring an impact assessment on the effect of a new academy on admissions, school funding and social cohesion, before an application to create a new academy would be permitted. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 26th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against a proposed measure which would have required a referendum of parents if any member of a school’s governing body objected to a decision by the governing body to apply for academy status. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against being more prescriptive in the Academies Bill on the subject of who must be consulted prior to an additional academy school being created. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring Academy Schools to follow the School Admissions Code. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to approve regulations amending the terms of the Child Trust Fund scheme. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring new academy schools to only be built in areas where there is a proven need for additional capacity. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring academy schools to have a curriculum which includes personal, social and health education. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 21st of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of allowing the UK Youth Parliament to use the House of Commons chamber on an annual basis. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 15th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to give ministers the power to repeal the high income excess relief charge under secondary legislation (ie. without prior approval of, or full scrutiny by, Parliament). (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 15th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against a proposal which would have prevented ministers using secondary legislation to repeal the high income excess relief charge without first publishing a report detailing any proposed replacement and assessing its impact. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 22nd of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring consultation to establish if existing schools in an area require capital investment and only providing that investment to an additional (new) academy school if the existing schools did not need it. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 15th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted in favour of setting a time limit ensuring that a range of motions relating to the workings of the House of Commons (the membership of committees and when the House sits) were disposed of that day. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 15th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against requiring the publication of a report on the implications of raising the age of compulsory annuitisation of pensions from 75 to 77 before the provision to make that change would be able to come into force. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 15th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted for an amendment which would have meant MPs elected to the Backbench Business Committee would, unless replaced, remain members of that committee for the remainder of the Parliament (until the next general election) rather than just until the end of the Session. Julian Huppert was on the losing side of this vote. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 15th of June 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted against making the Backbench Business Committee larger than the Government had proposed. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 6th of September 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted to authorise spending the money required to enact the Parliamentary Voting System and Constituencies Bill and pay the costs of the referendum on the alternative vote and the costs of the process of redrawing constituencies should the bill become law. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 14th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert voted not to keep the maximum period of detention of terrorist suspects at 28 days. Julian Huppert was on the losing side of this vote. (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 20th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert was absent when the majority of MPs approved a procedural motion allowing debate “until any hour” on the use of the Commons Chamber by the UK Youth Parliament (Further details via PublicWhip)
  • On the 20th of July 2010 Cambridge MP Julian Huppert was absent when the majority of MPs resolved to allow the UK Youth Parliament to use the House of Commons Chamber on an annual basis. This vote was re-held, a few days later resulting in the same outcome. (Further details via PublicWhip)

Why I Have Done This

Democracy relies on us holding those we choose to represent us to account; and to do that we need to be able to keep track of what they are doing.

The mySociety website TheyWorkForYou has a page for each MP on which it displays policy positions the MP has taken when voting in Parliament. These summaries are just a few words long and make it easy, at a glance, to find out how an MP has been voting in Parliament. There is a lot of work which goes into taking the information which comes out of Parliament in Hansard and distilling it down to those simple statements.

As part of doing my bit to try and keep those statements accurate and up-to-date I have been helping describe each of the votes in Parliament on the website PublicWhip (As of today, I have described all the divisions in the current Parliament). The preferred style on that site is to describe each vote in terms of what the majority of MPs voted for. I realised that by summarising each vote from the perspective of “the majority of MPs” I could, in cases where an individual MP had voted with the majority, switch the words “the majority of MPs” with the MPs name. In cases where an individual had voted the other way, or were absent I could also programatically adjust the language in an appropriate and readable manner. Therefore as well as describing Julian Huppert’s activity, I have been able to produce a summary of the voting record in the Parliament for every MP (Those in the south of Cambridge might be interested in Andew Lansley’s Record).

If I, or others, keep describing the divisions on PublicWhip my page on Julian Huppert’s Voting Record in Current Parliament, and those for all the other MPs, will stay up-to-date.

While I like being comprehensive and have splurged a lot of information onto one page, one could imagine using these short snippets on Twitter or Facebook, and one could just display the either the most important or the most recent handful on a webpage tracking an MP’s activity.

Work on grouping the divisions into policies, using the process described here, is underway. That is the next step towards providing robust data on the PublicWhip website which can be used to back up the succinct policy positions displayed on TheyWorkForYou.

While this is how the policy positions are built up, it is possible for those reading them, if they want more details, to reverse the process and drill down, through the policies and division descriptions on PublicWhip back to Parliament’s official record, Hansard, and the relevant amendment sheets, draft bills and order papers to obtain as much information as desired on how a particular MP has been voting on a subject.

Anyone who would like to help improve the information is welcome to do just what I’ve done and jump in and help out on the PublicWhip site where policies and division descriptions can be edited by anyone.

3 comments/updates on “Cambridge MP Julian Huppert’s Voting Record So Far

  1. Richard Taylor Article author

    Yesterday Julian Huppert rebelled against the Government and the Liberal Democrats for the second time.

    On the 9th of September 2010 Julian Huppert voted against the motion: “That this House supports the continued deployment of UK armed forces in Afghanistan.” Julian Huppert was on the losing side of this vote and only one other Liberal Democrat voted alongside him. (Further details via PublicWhip)

    In a related vote Mr Huppert abstained when the majority of MPs voted against making support for the continued deployment of UK armed forces in Afghanistan conditional on a change to military strategy designed to reduce loss of life, injuries, and costs. (Further details via PublicWhip)

  2. Anne Garvey

    Julian Huppert’s record in summary appears to feature a tremendous enthusiasm for an increase in VAT – he even voted against charities being exempted. At the hustings, this is not what he told the people of Cambridge.

    He is also against Trident (consistent with what he told us ) but also does not support the British and U.N. effort in Afganistan.

    I for one welcome this mini audit on what he’s been voting on – I wonder if he can continue to hold out against the other Lib Dems in taking the defence stand – the VAT position is disappointing. It is an unfair tax, it does hit uniformly at everyone and won’t it help put more businesses under pressure in the city?

Leave a Reply to Julian Huppert (via Twitter) Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published.
Please consider saying where you are from eg. "Cambridge".
Required fields are marked *

*

Powered by WP Hashcash